Sun-Dried Tomato Frittata with Sweet Vidalia Onion, Asiago, and Thyme

frittata

I finally did it. After years of foregoing the frittata for other, more common variations of the egg such as the scramble, omelet, hard-boiled, baked, and the fried egg, I finally crafted what I will coin as one of my “first original works”. I did so with an assist from the Tenth Anniversary Edition of How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman, a necessary and pertinent cooking doctrine for any aspiring cook. In truth, the only difference between a regular omelet and the frittata is that the frittata remains flat during cooking and consumption. The advantages lie in the fact that this particular egg dish can be consumed at room temperature or hot off the presses, can be eaten at any meal or time of day, and frittatas serve as standout brunch or party staples because they can be made ahead of time, with virtually any possible combination of ingredients.

As with many egg dishes, perhaps the most advantageous quality is the versatility one has in selecting flavors and toppings. My hand-picked toppings included: sun-dried tomatoes in, quality asiago cheese, fresh thyme, and sweet vidalia onion. The tastes and textures blend together seamlessly, as the soft onion complements the roughly textured skin of the sun-dried tomatoes. Topped with a sprinkle of herbs and melted cheese, this is frittata heaven, at least to me.

The cooking time for a frittata may vary depending on how crisp or soft you prefer your eggs (5-10 minutes total). As Bittman notes, you can always throw your saucepan under the broiler for a 1-2 minutes at 350 F to take care of any unset eggs. I made my frittata nearly 12 hours ahead of time (in preparation for my 7 hour drive to Virginia for Thanksgiving), reheated in a pan over low heat, and meticulously carved it into two equal halves for my girlfriend and me.) I enjoyed the crisp (but not burnt) nature of these eggs, even on the bottom of the frittata. Cooking this frittata proved to be welcome change-up from what I normally cook in the morning, as far as egg dishes are concerned. This is a great recipe for the impending winter months, as I intend to experiment with different flavor combinations and usher this into my “staple eats” category. Simple to make, delicious to taste. Enjoy!

Sun-dried Tomato Frittata with Sweet Vidalia Onion, Asiago, & Thyme
Recipe adapted from How to Cook Everything by Mark Bittman
Serves 4

2 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
1/2 sweet vidalia onion, sliced
Salt and freshly ground pepper
1 jar sun-dried tomato, in oil
6-8 eggs
1/2 cup freshly grated Asiago cheese
Fresh thyme

Put a tablespoon of the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the onion and cook, sprinkling with salt and pepper, until soft, about 5 minutes. Add the sun-dried tomato and turn the heat down to low. Cook, stirring occasionally until the pan is almost dry, another five minutes or ago.

Meanwhile, beat the eggs with some salt and pepper. Pour the eggs over the tomato, using a spoon if necessary to evenly distribute the vegetables. Sprinkle the cheese over top and cook, undisturbed, until the eggs are barely set, 5-10 minutes. (You can set them further by putting the pain in a 250 F oven for a few minutes or by running it under the broiler for a minute or two.) Serve hot, warm, or room temperature. Top with thyme.

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